Theodora

Out of Character

Casa di Cavalieri
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Becky --
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Minnesota --
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Thu Jan 31, 2019 3:04 am Becky#5187
Tamlin 115
Sat Jul 13, 2019 1:47 pm
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In Character

Female 22 Jul 2017
Wolf/dog hybrid. Ortus
There is nothing particularly spectacular about Theodora’s appearance. Her height is middling to short, and her belly underfed; it appears that spending one’s time concerned with vegetation over meat doesn’t lend itself much to robustness. Her expression falls easily to a frown more fit to a scolding mother than a young wolf, and her smile is more anxious than happy. Her coat is a casual, nondescript timber with intermingling white and browns, the occasional hint of dog-born liver shining through in the sun. She carries herself submissively, furtively; aggressive posturing is as foreign to her body as flying. Theodora is, for the most part, completely forgettable in appearance.

The one glitter in the granite is her hereditary link to her mother. “Twilight eyes,” as her family had called them. While her mother’s had been a paler violet, Theodora’s are a deeper hue, her mother’s pigment splashed with her father’s navy. They are her best feature, though it’s difficult to get a good look at them—the girl is constantly looking downward, either avoiding confrontation or sniffing out the next round of herbs for her work. And the work is never far: around her neck hangs a leather pouch, no matter her form. Stuffed with a variety of ingredients, it gives her a strange perfume, especially if she’s found something particularly rare lately.
Theodora suffers from that common affliction of both craving social interaction and yet wanting to be alone the second she’s found it. She spent most of her youth under the tutelage of her mother Duenna, learning the methods of their heritage, delving into the spiritual depths of her mother’s religion. For her part, Duenna was an accomplished master of her art, imparting great knowledge to her daughter, especially when it came to herbalism and healing. However, she was a wolf prone to the whimsies of the wind; Theodora often found her other needs neglected in favor of her mother’s work. Education outside the scope of druidcraft was vehemently opposed, and any relationships Theodora managed to broker with other wolves were soon scattered as her mother’s work called them elsewhere.

The result of this lonely apprenticeship was a very specifically talented Theodora who could still manage to fail some of the most simple tasks that other wolves have mastered. After her separation from her mother, Theodora has sought out new forms of company, but often finds herself resorting to bargaining her healing or spiritual services in exchange for protection or food. When the occasion arises that Theodora has company, her desire to please others is often in direct conflict with her awkwardness, resulting in very few friendships throughout her life. This is something that she is very motivated to change.

In regards to her Luperci status, Theodora almost exclusively prefers the Lupus form. The Optime form is used mostly for the preparation and application of medicinal implements. When desperate, she has been known to resort to the Secui form for hunting purposes. There is a part of Theodora that associates the Optime form with socialization and family, likely causing her avoidance of it.
The act of procuring a child was strictly business for Duenna. The Violet Witch had long wandered the remains of the American Midwest; she birthed pups, healed the sick, and guided the dying to a more peaceful resolution with poppy flower. A stern woman, she had never seemed interested in having a family of her own, until she came upon the pack of wolves dwelling in what had once been Shakopee, Minnesota. Before she had been forced to leave him, Theodora’s smitten father had often lulled her to sleep with the story of her mother’s snow-swept form emerging from the shadows of the fire. “You could see the cosmos in her eyes, just like yours, little Theo,” he would proclaim, bringing his face to hers and touching noses affectionately. “Someday, you will be great like her.” He seemed to favor her from her siblings, spending every free moment with her that he could—perhaps he could sense the words Duenna had not yet said.

Theodora’s mother had had little difficulty charming Regan. To him, their romance seemed fated and passionate, a gift from the gods his pack clung to so dearly. However, Duenna had withdrawn from him the second she confirmed the pregnancy. Regan was a forgotten afterthought; the forest druid would disappear for days at a time, whispering cryptically to her belly. Nevertheless, he was a loyal wolf, and he considered her his mate. He dutifully provided, excited himself to meet his babes. When the time came, Duenna was gone again—returning days later with three children to present him. Regan did not admonish her. Perhaps it was a weakness on his part, or maybe he had just assumed them all lost to him and was happy enough to have them back. In any case, he took to raising the children with gusto. Duenna, meanwhile, cared only for one.

As Theodora aged, Duenna began to leave Regan for longer periods again, taking only Theodora with her. The other two “Don’t have the right eyes, daughter.” If the statement had been intended to make Theodora feel special, it had utterly failed. She felt only shame of herself and jealousy of her two siblings, who got to stay with father, with the pack. Theodora felt her world was a sky: her father was the warm sun, and her mother a bone-chilling moon. When Duenna told her on one of their “trips” that they would never be returning to her father’s pack, Theodora felt the sun had set on her life forever.

She distracted herself with the work. If she could not have her mother’s love, she would have her respect: she learned her medicines, she perfected her splints and her salves. Though she never heard the voices of the gods like her mother claimed to, Theodora could recite the chants and hymns with convincing authority. If she ever expressed any doubts in the efficiency of prayer, her mother would only stare with those violet eyes.

So life continued, for a while. In and out of other packs, catching glimpses of their happiness, only to steal away afterwards with her mother into the same familiar darkness. Theodora had almost become complacent to it when Duenna approached her the last morning. “You will go now, daughter, to the north. The gods say there is no more I can teach you.” Despite Theodora’s wails, Duenna left as abruptly as she always had, her countenance placid as the moon.
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