Amputated Limbs and Prosthetics
#1
I have seen several 'Souls characters with varying degrees of missing limbs so I understand that that in and of itself is a possibility for a character. Would a simple prosthetic be possible? I figure having prosthetic arms would be difficult as hands are a hard thing to reproduce feasibly within the 'Soulsverse for Luperci. But would simple prosthetic legs be okay? Probably only from the knee down as creating fake knees may be too hard for Luperci technology.

I'm imagining something like Hiccup's prosthetic leg from How To Train Your Dragon. More detailed pictures can be seen here.
Regdevious
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#2
Hiccup's prosthetic is probably a very challenging thing to make.

A peg-leg might be more possible but I'd also imagine that a character without a hind-leg might prefer to use a crutch in Optime or just be on 3 legs instead.
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#3
That's understandable. Maybe some sort of metal and wood prosthetic could be made but not quite that detailed.

Or just a crutch of some kind!
Regdevious
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#4
I think it should be possible for a Luperci to make what is essentially a bent piece of metal. I'm less sure about how they'd attach the thing to the stump as I think a fitted "collar" around the stump would be very difficult to size correctly. I also don't really think they'd be able to make screw fittings, so having swappable legs, as suggested below, may not be possible, in hindsight.



As such, if the individual does shift regularly, it makes more sense to just use a crutch in Optime and go without the leg in Lupus.
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#5
As someone who knows nothing about prosthetics, maybe some sort of strap system might help? A cursory google search shows that some very, very old (like, 2,000+ year old) complex prosthetics (something that resembles a leg vs a peg leg) were theorized to be kept on with straps or waist belts connected to straps, and modern, harness attached and boot-like prosthetics are common for real three-legged dogs.
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#6
Yeah, straps and harnesses could work, though I imagine that they'd need to be very secure, but belts and ropes can come lose if there's too much movement or they're not tightened improperly -- which could be something fun to explore ICly, tbh. Luperci aren't as dexterous as humans so anything extra fiddly would be hard for them to deal with, and it can also be difficult for a Lupus-form tripod to always depend on someone else to help them in and out of a harness.
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#7
Personally, I feel like an Optime with a harness of sorts with a pegleg/metal-ish prosthetic would find it easiest to go on three legs in Lupus form :0 I've read that animals like dogs and cats are able to adjust to having three legs just fine, I figure it wouldn't be much different for other canines!
Regdevious
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#8
Oh, agreed. There's plenty of evidence that quadruped animals are able to adjust to being a tripod pretty quickly.

But it can be different story if the individual in question prefers to spend most of their time in Optime form. They may feel going entirely hand-less in Lupus form to be as much a handicap as a prosthetic or harness.
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#9
I have returned

I'm developing a character that will have a missing leg, from about the knee/calf down :0 He'll be knowledgable about metalworking and probably dabble in wood- and leatherworking as well... With the help of his more experienced family, would a simple prosthetic like this be feasible for Luperci to make? I took Kiri's drawing from above as a reference <3

[Image: k0ujobL.jpg]

I understand straps like this are a bit fiddly to make for Luperci, especially with the buckles, but I've looked up some pretty simple metal belt buckles that look like they wouldn't be too hard to make!

If this isn't realistic for Luperci to make, I can go with something else, I just wanted to check before I made anything concrete! <3
Regdevious
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#10
Can they make that? Probably yes.

Would it be perfect as a replacement limb? Definitely not. I think there'd need to be a lot more straps and securements involved to reduce the prosthetic from wobbling around and it's likely that any intense or sudden movement like running or like, riding a horse, would jostle it loose. Constantly re-securing may be necessary. Like, the character would essentially be putting their full weight on this and every bend of the knee reduces tension in that main strap.

All that said, I think those challenges could be really fun to explore in RP. The character might also make use of a crutch when they don't feel like dealing with the prosthetic. The character would probably also be considerably more mobile in Lupus form, so they might adapt to doing more things in that form when permissible. Walking is the main challenge for an Optime with a missing leg, but that's something that's easy to make up in Lupus form with two more (fore)legs. And many activities requiring use of hands are done seated.

But there are definitely activities where use of Optime hands and legs are optimal -- especially if the character is a metalworker or woodworker. But activities like hammering metal or chopping wood are among those that would be hard on a prosthetic. :o

Def lots of cool ideas to explore here.
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#11
Echoing the commentary re: straps, I would also consider avoiding buckles in favor of something more like a ring belt, where there's less holes/metal. That would be far more adjustable and easily tightened.

Metal would also run into issues with exposure to the elements, such as rust and decay. Luperci wouldn't have access to the type of material humans use for modern prosthetic devices, and metal is heavy. A different material for the base might be a better bet. Antique prosthetic were often wood and leather, with only minimal metal used. Though the technology level is more advanced than what 'Souls could manage, I suggest checking out Civil War Prosthetics.

Another big thing to explore would be learning to use the prosthetic. Crutches would still be required while a character learned to walk again, and having some sort of support vs relying entirely on a prosthetic would likely be a safer route to go long term, such as a crutch, cane, or walking stick.
“History doesn't repeat itself, but it does rhyme.” ― Mark Twain
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#12
Not 'SA, but, here's my suggestions?

Knee-down amputation vs. Calf-down amputation:
If you cut the leg off at the kneecap, I think the prosthetic would be a lot more simple/easier to do manage? You could honestly just make it a straight peg leg. While, yes, it doesn't have the look or angles as a normal Optime Luperci's leg does, but, it would still bear weight, is simple in design, and the rigging would be less complicated in my opinion, since the entire leg would move as one unit vs. a jointed one. The rigging would only need to secure itself to the thigh and hip vs. starting all the way down at the lower leg. Your character is going to have a noticeable limp and locomotion problems either way.

Rigging brainstorm for a calf-down amuptation:
Here's my brainstorm of an Optime rigging that could be doable by Luperci means?
  • 1) To make the leg more secure, less likely to slide down/off, or, simply to reduce constantly having to make readjustments to the prosthetic, having "belts" (or even simple straps, since they wouldn't need readjusting if they're made to fit) to secure it to the Luperci's waist, as has been previously pointed out, would be ideal. Looking at ancient/early prosthetics, this idea is a common theme, it seems. I think having the "belts" secure the prosthetic leg from the front and back would help secure it better than one "belt" on the outside of the thigh.

  • 2) For lower limb amputations and even knee-down ones, they all seem to have something that secures it to the thigh. In placement of buckles, I'd suggest twine/sinew/etc. to lace it together. I'd also suggest leather or hide, as it these would be sturdier than any material a Luperci could make (cotton, wool, etc. would tear and wear too easily). The "belts" in your design would be too loose/flimsy, as they'd shift and move much more freely (thus not providing the support needed) than something that is more solid/stiffer and encompasses the entire leg. Leather, of course, will likely chaff at the fur after a while, but, having thin fur around one thigh is a cheap price to pay for being able to walk.

    Referencing older prosthetics too, it seems that most leave an opening for the knee (1, 2, 3, 4, 5), and attach to the lower part of the prosthetic from the sides.

  • 3) Securing the lower half of the prosthetic to what remains of the calf would help ensure that the lower leg is less likely to slip off. A "sleeve" (6) or some type of way to "cup" the calf (7) would probably help.

  • 4) Obviously, cushioning would be necessary where the prosthetic meets the leg. This would likely need to be changed often as the material becomes more and more compacted with the constant weight of the Luperci.

  • 5) Because metal is heavy and more prone to rusting (because of snow, water, our proximity to the ocean, etc.), I think wood would honestly be the only viable option after some trial and error? Wood, as has been stated by the others, is also lighter. As well, it can be carved much more easily to the desired shape rather than having to be heated up and molded, and hoping that one didn't accidentally make it more brittle. I would go for a much more simple design; a semi-straight peg is less likely to catch or break than something meant to look like an actual foot. In my brainstorm design, I actually made the wood come up to the sides of the kneecap. Looking at some of the really old prosthetics (8, 9), a lot of them had similar designs, likely, to made the leg more stable, since it could be secured to more of the actual leg vs. only having the nub.

    Of course, wood is going to wear down after a while. This isn't a bad thing though! It can give a greater immersion for RP fun/ideas as your character finds themselves having to replace the leg or looking forward to a new one!
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#13
Also not SA but another thing to consider is damage to the stump from constantly rubbing on whatever the leg is made of. I believe this is still an issue with modern prosthetics, and an open wound for a Luperci is even more troublesome because of the general lower level of medical knowledge. I found an interesting article that pertains to humans of course, but it asks a lot of good questions. And another article that talks about common issues. I think Luperci might have a lot of similar issues.

So, it could be interesting to explore the character trying to decide if it's better to have no prosthetic or one that hurts but lets them walk kind of, especially since humans often have the benefit of nice smooth sidewalks and floors to walk over while Luperci do not. It could be an "inside thing" and outside it's easier to use a crutch or Lupus form.
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#14
This is all super helpful, thanks guys!!
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