armor question

POSTED: Wed Mar 14, 2018 3:31 pm

What happens if you sandwiched a piece of metal between two pieces of leather and sew it together? Would that work for armor? What if you make scale armor by sandwiching little metal pieces between leather and then sewing it to a bigger piece of leather, as y'know, an alternative to actually learning how to work the metal?

You'd still need to scavenge pieces that are the right size, or find out how to cut it to size, and also grind down the edge so that it's not sharp enough to cut through the leather, and then maybe hammer it flat -- but would that work?

I'm asking because this is something I want Brickface to eventually try when I register, but I am unsure how to research this. As far as I can tell, this isn't something anyone has tried RL. Granted, if someone knew that metal existed and used it in armor in human history, they just skipped the "wrap it in leather" stage because they can just blacksmith it. Brickface can't unless she finds someone to teach her.

POSTED: Wed Mar 14, 2018 4:20 pm

Well, you'd end up with something really heavy! You're basically describing body armor that would function a bit like a stab-resistant vest or a weighted vest for workouts, I'm guessing?

Depending on the thickness of both the leather and the metal, you could make pieces like those described. Working thicker leather requires a lot of tools as well, especially piercing this in order to stitch it up. A lot of force needs to go into getting through that. If you used something thinner that could work too. That all depends on a few things though: What would your character know how to do? What would they have access to? If they don't really know how armor is meant to work they might end up with something ill fitting (too small or large) and that could cause more problems than benefits!

Keep in mind that any sort of weighted garments would put new strain on the wearer's body, especially something unevenly distributed like "free-floating" hunks of metal. The same stress would be put on the stitching of your outfit, which could require repair or risk failure down the line.
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POSTED: Wed Mar 14, 2018 5:22 pm

Salvia Eternity wrote:Well, you'd end up with something really heavy! You're basically describing body armor that would function a bit like a stab-resistant vest or a weighted vest for workouts, I'm guessing?


I think in our past, humans solved that problem by training people so that they were used to the weight. Brickface wouldn't have that advantage since her background doesn't include that training. The most they would wear is a whole lot of leather, and even too much of that wouldn't have been practical with the hot climate.

Not that she won't try wearing whatever abomination she creates, of course. Most of what I get when I google "weighted vest" + "injuries" is back pain and ominous sounding spinal compression. I think I'd have to write that she stopped wearing it when it became painful, to prevent the latter from happening.

Salvia Eternity wrote:Depending on the thickness of both the leather and the metal, you could make pieces like those described. Working thicker leather requires a lot of tools as well, especially piercing this in order to stitch it up. A lot of force needs to go into getting through that. If you used something thinner that could work too. That all depends on a few things though: What would your character know how to do? What would they have access to? If they don't really know how armor is meant to work they might end up with something ill fitting (too small or large) and that could cause more problems than benefits!

Keep in mind that any sort of weighted garments would put new strain on the wearer's body, especially something unevenly distributed like "free-floating" hunks of metal. The same stress would be put on the stitching of your outfit, which could require repair or risk failure down the line.


I haven't decided whether she actually knows how to make leather, or whether she just steals it from other people. She did at one point know someone who knew how to do this, so it's possible that she has a very bare knowledge that will lead her to creating really shitty leather. Most of her actual skill in leather-working consists of sewing things together. I think if she wanted to make a hole in leather, she'd just try hammering a nail through it and then pulling the nail out.

The stitching thing might damn her before anything else does, since she hasn't had the time to sit down and perfect that skill. Her experience comes from repairing armor between fights, not creating it. She at least had someone else's base to work off of before adding stuff to it.

Googling 'ill-fitting armor' gets me a lot of silly nonsense, and then a semi-useful news story about women in the army having to make do with armor that's built for men, and dealing with gaps + blood flow constriction, so that gives me an idea of what she'd be experiencing when making her abominations.

POSTED: Wed Mar 14, 2018 9:08 pm

Brickface O'Malley wrote:[...] a semi-useful news story about women in the army having to make do with armor that's built for men, and dealing with gaps + blood flow constriction, so that gives me an idea of what she'd be experiencing when making her abominations.


I can actually comment on this one xD

The military (or at least the US Army) does not make special plates/armor for women. It's a universal kit. You get small, medium, large, extra large, or some monstrosity if you're a big mf. The chest plates are the same for both men and women, as are the vests that they are fitted into. The only difference is the size. Obviously, if you don't have the right size for your body, it isn't going to work very well for you, and will often be more cumbersome and a bother than it's worth.

Kevlars that are too big for your head will only get in your way, those that are too small will give you a headache; neither will protect your brains like they're intended to if you're not properly fitted to the right size.

The same goes for vests. I had to wear a vest that was too big for me because we didn't have any smalls, and that was a right pain. Even after 2 months of having to wear this thing everyday for anywhere between 4-7 hours at a time, my body never really got used to it. My shoulders always hurt, my back always hurt, when I sat down, the thing basically acted like I was sitting in a turtle shell. Overall, it was just a pain. Too big, too bulky, and improperly fitted. Yeah, it protected my chest, but, it made my life miserable to wear it all the time.

Elbow and knee pads that are too big usually block movement and typically have a hard time staying where they're supposed to and usually end up sliding off what they're built to "protect."


Also, obviously, if you're an unfortunate woman with big titties, that vest is going to be more noticeably uncomfortable to wear than someone that has some flat tires x3 You'd also have to consider how it would mold against the body because big boobs will make the front chest plate not fit as well as it should. So, you can either smash 'em, or, find a way to make the metal more form-fitting.


For the "free-floating" bit, the US Army vests are fit to make sure that the plates don't move except to slide out when the velcro piece that keeps them locked in is opened. They're pretty heavily layered/thick because those plates are pretty heavy (they're made to stop a bullet though, so, kind of overkill for a knife stabbing xD). Since Luperci don't have access to velcro, the metal-inside-leather would probably be a one and done type of deal. Once it's sewn shut, it's there unless you cut it open. I'd stress that the seams would have to be pretty well done to keep a heavier piece of metal from eventually wearing them down, cutting the leather, or simply causing them to fail/break.


Another thing I would consider too though would be how the armor would rub against your character's fur. If they wear this all the time, and its got quite a bit of weight to it, it would likely rub certain areas bare that come into frequent and constant contact with the armor. If you got a lot of metal or, even pretty thick leather, I'd recommend having the character wear something underneath it like a shirt or pants to prevent those areas from becoming thin/bald. My dad used to wear a flight suit and had to carry some heavy stuff in his calf pockets. He has smooth-as-silk skin where his calf pockets used to be and not a hair to be seen!
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